Commonplace Post (3)

Click on an image to go to its post/site/whatever.

On Eurocentricity in Fantasy Fiction @ Diversity in YA Fiction

Picture of a mysterious book sculpture (looks like a tree growing out of a book)
Book Sculptures Mysteriously Appear In Scottish Libraries

How to Manage the Monster that has become your Review Pile @ Mindful Musings

The Plight of the Eclectic Blogger:

I feel like sometimes, as an eclectic blogger, that I get overlooked–by other bloggers and publishers. YA readers might get bored if they see too many adult fiction titles and adult readers might just lump me in with all the other YA bloggers out there. Publishers might question my audience and think that I’m not the right “fit” for their book but fail to see that I get quite a positive response on both my YA fiction reviews and adult reviews. Sometimes I feel like my readership is pretty even.

I’ve contemplated so many times about just sticking to one or the other for the sake of pacifying my blogging woes but then, in the same moment of apparent “clarity,” I realize that would be so untrue to myself. Ultimately this blog is for me but I really enjoy discussing the heck out of books with people and have grown quite fond of my readers and our interactions. I love that my discussion posts bring readers of all genres and levels together but will it make them stay? Will they just ignore the books that don’t interest them and stick with me and wait for something to pique their interest? Will I open their eyes to a book they might not have considered before because it wasn’t in their typical reading genre?

Picture of pillows shaped like alpacas (really)
IT'S GOT A SCENTED BUTT

I have numbers! Stats on LGBT Young Adult Books Published in the U.S. @ Malinda Lo’s blog

Novelist ditches publisher at book launch for ‘condescending’ treatment @ guardian.co.uk

YOU CAN STUFF YOUR MARY-SUE WHERE THE SUN DON’T SHINE:

I’m sick of it, Dear Readers. I’m sick of seeing people condemn any female character with a significant role in a book as a Mary-Sue. I’m sick of people talking about how the female characters were too perfect or not perfect enough, too passive or too badass, too talented or too useless, when what they really mean – but don’t even KNOW they mean – is that the characters were too much in possession of lady parts.

Sort of related to the above: Why So Many Men? @ Kate Griffin’s blog

What’s going on with #yesGayYA @ cleolinda’s blog

La Fumeuse by Georges De Feure, 1910 France

8 thoughts on “Commonplace Post (3)”

    1. I am seriously going to hunt down that alpaca pillow and MAKE IT MY OWN. Who doesn’t want a pillow animal with a scented butt?

  1. Ooh, that first link is for me! There are so many eclectic bloggers out there (myself included!) that you’d think we’d form an alliance or something. EBA — the Eclectic Bloggers’ Alliance? I think we all face similar problems, yet no one wants to alter their blog or reading to fit what publishers/etc. want.

    I like the random nature of this post. It makes me happy. Especially the alpaca pillows with scented butts. (Umm…good scented, I hope?)

    1. If I was truly worried about what publishers/etc. wanted I don’t think I’d even have a blog because I don’t think it’d be very fun. Plus, I don’t think it’d come out very authentic and people would know I was fake and I’d have to hide my head in the sand in shame. Anyway.

  2. It does seem like male characters are expected to behave with logic and motivation, while a female character… isn’t. I think that’s one of the reasons m/m romance is so successful right now; you don’t have to put with the heroine bullshit.

    1. I do think it’s a weird thing that if a male protagonist is unemotional, that’s fine, but if a female protagonist is the same somehow she’s a cold-hearted bitch. You know? Why do women automatically have to spend ten pages delving into their psyche/heart/whatever and men can just keep moving on in the plot.

      Like, take murder mysteries. Male detectives can look at a murder scene coldly and it’s fine. Maybe they have a line about how it makes them sick or something. Female detectives, meanwhile, have to have at least a page detailing how they feel looking at it and how it makes her feel and how she’s never going to be the same afterward and so on. Bah.

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