REVIEW: Primates by Jim Ottaviani and Maris Wicks

I don’t know much about primates. Monkeys, apes, whatever: besides what little I know from watching a few specials on the Animal Planet channel I caught years ago, they’re basically a mystery. I know even less about the three women who researched primates SO HARD they’re still creating shockwaves. Primates is an adorable and informative biography of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Biruté Galdikas, with a mini-bio of Louis Leakey thrown in for kicks. It’s Read More …

Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

I have a love-hate relationship with Apple in that I love their products when they work, but hate them when they don’t. More importantly, though, I’m super interested in the history of technology, especially computers! I’ve been wanting to read this Steve Jobs biography for a while now but got discouraged because the hardback is frickin’ heavy; luckily there’s an ebook version on Scribd, so I read it on my iPhone instead. Steve Jobs was Read More …

The Astronaut Wives Club by Lily Koppel

I love space! I love people who study space, people who go out into space, people who send other people out into space to study it, etc. etc. You hand me anything involving space ships, aliens, or intergalactic flight, and I am THERE.1 I’m particularly into the early space stuff, from the 1940-1970s. The Astronaut Wives Club, on the surface, seemed like something I’d be into because it covers that time period AND it’s about Read More …

REVIEW & GIVEAWAY: Historical Heartthrobs: 50 Timeless Crushes—From Cleopatra to Camus

The only thing I love more than history is the people who lived it! And I especially love books who go beyond what you’d expect from a history book. Like a quirky who’s who of hotness, Historical Heartthrobs has a ton of interesting people in it. It starts with Cleopatra and ends with Benazir Bhutto, and between those two are some amazing mini-biographies. There’s a good mix of people here, both good and bad. I Read More …

Chicken with Plums by Marjane Satrapi

Love Marjane Satrapi’s books, love her family, love the stories she tells about her family in her books. This one is more depressing than some of her other ones, because it’s focused so heavily on one person and his life/memories/hallucinations as he starves himself to death. The tone of Chicken with Plums is kinda interesting– it’s not judgmental of anyone in the story, really. It’s more reverential, or like she’s telling a legendary story from Read More …

Girl Sleuth by Melanie Rehak

I’ve read a few Nancy Drew books before, but I’ve always found the idea of Nancy Drew more satisfying than the actual stories. Teenage super-sleuths are ALWAYS cool, and Nancy is cooler than most because she’s so deeply ingrained into the public consciousness. She’s like Star Wars or Indiana Jones or some other non-movie franchise I can’t think of right now: you may not know the details of her life, but you sure as heck Read More …

Juliette Gordon Low by Stacy A. Cordery

I wanted to read this because of Only Pack What You Can Carry— the author mentioned Juliette Gordon Low (most often called Daisy) as being a remarkably couragous person (who also travelled) and I love histories of clubs/societies/whatever, so it seemed like a good idea to get a biography of JGL so I could learn more. It covers almost all of JGL’s life, including her birth shortly before the American Civil War ’til somewhere around Read More …

REVIEWS: Wrapping up 2012

These are it! The last reviews for books read in 2012. I’ve only got a few so I’m just sticking them all in one post. Then it’s on to new things. Huzzah! I’ve watched various Sherlock Holmes TV shows so many times I can’t remember whether or not I’ve actually read the stories, so I think I’ll review the audiobook production instead. I got this version free for Amazon’s Whispersync promo thing; it’s produced by Read More …

MINI-REVIEWS: The 14th Dalai Lama and Gandhi manga biographies

Book cover of the 14th Dalai Lama: a manga biography

It’s always difficult to compress a person’s life story into a book that’s less than 200 pages, but The 14th Dalai Lama: A Manga Biography made a decent effort. It highlights the important parts of the Dalai Lama’s life, from childhood to adulthood, and it gives a good overview of the situation with Tibet and China. The art was nice, if not overly detailed, and the writing was pretty compelling. Maybe some scenes were a Read More …

REVIEW: Ringlingville USA by Jerry Apps

Look, clowns are scary, right? But clowns aren’t the only part of a circus and I LOVE the circus, even if I haven’t been to one since I was 10 or 12 or something. That last circus? That last circus was the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus, and it was AWESOME. I love books about circuses, real or imagined, and so by all rights this book, which is about the history of the Read More …