REVIEW: The House at Royal Oak by Carol Eron Rizzoli

I have only once ever stayed at a bed-and-breakfast, about 15 years ago, so I don’t actually remember much. I do remember each room had a different theme, and it was in a HUGE house so there were lots of rooms to explore. Also they had no television, which was tragic for a 10-year-old (even one who liked to read). Nevertheless, I came away from that weekend with a love of the idea of B&Bs. Read More …

Girls to the Front by Sara Marcus

When I was a teenager, which at this point is over 10 years ago, I somehow stumbled across zines. Possibly I found them through this fun site which was a message board/eBay combo where you could sell stuff to other people and then maybe they’d pay you for it.1 Anyway, I found zines, and then I bought a lot of them, and then I made some of my own, and THEN I found out about Read More …

Lily Dale: The True Story of the Town That Talks to the Dead by Christine Wicker

This is my second Christine Wicker book; the first one was Not in Kansas Anymore, which I remember liking except for how she kept sticking her own memoir into it. I wanted it to be a straight-forward account of the history of magic in America, not some random person’s quest to meet magical people and see if they’re real or not.1 Lily Dale is exactly the same thing Not in Kansas Anymore is: some random Read More …

REVIEW: Primates by Jim Ottaviani and Maris Wicks

I don’t know much about primates. Monkeys, apes, whatever: besides what little I know from watching a few specials on the Animal Planet channel I caught years ago, they’re basically a mystery. I know even less about the three women who researched primates SO HARD they’re still creating shockwaves. Primates is an adorable and informative biography of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Biruté Galdikas, with a mini-bio of Louis Leakey thrown in for kicks. It’s Read More …

The Astronaut Wives Club by Lily Koppel

I love space! I love people who study space, people who go out into space, people who send other people out into space to study it, etc. etc. You hand me anything involving space ships, aliens, or intergalactic flight, and I am THERE.1 I’m particularly into the early space stuff, from the 1940-1970s. The Astronaut Wives Club, on the surface, seemed like something I’d be into because it covers that time period AND it’s about Read More …

REVIEW & GIVEAWAY: Historical Heartthrobs: 50 Timeless Crushes—From Cleopatra to Camus

The only thing I love more than history is the people who lived it! And I especially love books who go beyond what you’d expect from a history book. Like a quirky who’s who of hotness, Historical Heartthrobs has a ton of interesting people in it. It starts with Cleopatra and ends with Benazir Bhutto, and between those two are some amazing mini-biographies. There’s a good mix of people here, both good and bad. I Read More …

DNF: Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan

I love Carl Sagan! I’ve yet to actually finish a book written by Carl Sagan, nor have I watched any of his TV show(s). I love the idea of Carl Sagan, I guess? I love the idea of this smart, kind, science-y dude running around inspiring people to love science, too. Also, the Symphony of Science songs are amazing: That said, I kinda think Pale Blue Dot was a bad choice for a first Carl Read More …

Girl Sleuth by Melanie Rehak

I’ve read a few Nancy Drew books before, but I’ve always found the idea of Nancy Drew more satisfying than the actual stories. Teenage super-sleuths are ALWAYS cool, and Nancy is cooler than most because she’s so deeply ingrained into the public consciousness. She’s like Star Wars or Indiana Jones or some other non-movie franchise I can’t think of right now: you may not know the details of her life, but you sure as heck Read More …

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

I put off reading Persepolis for the longest time because I thought it’d be depressing and I’m a big emotional scaredy-cat. While Persepolis DOES have its darker moments, what I ended up reading wasn’t a story of unrelenting sadness. Instead, there’s humor, lots of love, and a big fat epiphany that I’m a dunderhead. I’m stupid for being scared off a book, but I’m ALSO stupid because of this: intellectually, I know that not everyone Read More …

In the City of Bikes: The Story of the Amsterdam Cyclist by Pete Jordan

In the City of Bikes by Pete Jordan

I’ll be honest. If I hadn’t been offered In the City of Bikes for review, I’d probably never have read it on my own. I’d never have known what a good read I’d have missed out on. I’d never learn about Amsterdam and its history with bicycles and why that history is so frickin’ cool! And that’d have been a shame, because I feel about ten times smarter from having read this book. Through a Read More …