Very quick reviews: December 2015, part 2 (graphic novels)

I read some comics this month! They turned out to mostly be all YA comics, too.
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How Mirka Got Her Sword and How Mirka Met a Meteorite – Barry Deutsch ★★★½ / ★★★
These are two books starring an Orthodox Jewish girl named Mirka who meets a witch, fights monsters, learns important things about family, and passes along information about Jewish holidays and customs to the reader through sidenotes and storylines. I particularly like the way faces were drawn, the story was fun, and I liked how Mirka was actually kind of UNlikable for much of the first half of the story before turning things around.

Moomin and the Golden Tail – Tove Jansson ★★★½
My first Moomin book! This one is about how Moomin randomly grows a golden tail, becomes famous, and comes to regrets his popularity when things like stalkers and false friends show up. The Moomin art style is lots of fun; they all look cuddly and friendly and I like the use of subdued, flat color.

Lumberjanes vol. 1: Beware the Kitten Holy and vol. 2: Friendship to the Max – Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, Shannon Watter, Brooke Allen, Maarta Laiho ★★★ / ★★★½
Lumberjanes is about a group of girls at a summer camp who have adventures with monsters and possessed boy campers and a creepy bear woman and their long-suffering camp counselor, Jane! Wonderful art and very vibrant colors; the characters are super fun and I especially liked all the little shout-outs to important historical women and classic feminist movies (A League of Their Own!).

This One Summer – Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki ★★★★
Painfully accurate portrayal of what it’s like to be a tween on the cusp of puberty, tbh. It’s about a girl spending a few weeks at her family’s summer cabin, basically, but it’s also about growing up, figuring out your parents aren’t perfect, that kids are judgmental beasts but they can definitely get better, and all the super awkward things that being a kid in an adult’s world means. WONDERFUL art, with exquisitely detailed backgrounds and faces, too.

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